?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Why Host A Writing Contest?

Most of you know that AnthologyBuilder sponsored a writing contest this year. (The judges are still out on the finalists: results soon.)

Of the marketing tools I've utilized, writing contests rank very near the top. Why?

1. They attract attention
Contests are fun, and nothing is quite as alluring as the prospect of shiny prizes. People will not only enter the contest, but will cheerfully tell their friends about it, link to it, and so forth.

2. They encourage new visitors
Many marketing efforts are aimed at encouraging previous visitors to come back to the web site. Contests reach a new audience because they're interesting to groups who have had no prior exposure to your product.

3. They are not pushy
I hate pushy sales-people, blinking web banners, and pesky spam emails saying "Buy! Buy! Buy!"

Contests are a pleasant marketing tool because they are totally laid-back. Entrants don't have to make a purchase or ever come back to the site. It serves the noble goal of marketing ('making people aware of your product') without falling into the sleazy pitfalls ('pressuring people to buy something they don't really want').

4. They give something back
Writing contests are a great way to support and enourage aspiring writers. (I'm not sure why, but new writers seem far more likely to enter contests than they are to submit to established magazines. Perhaps it's because contests feel less threatening.) It gives something back to the community, and that makes me feel all warm-fuzzy inside.

* * *

Short version: I heart contests. If I ever manage to (a) finish A New Kind of Sunrise and (b) sell it, I am sure as heck going to find a way to tie a writing contest into the marketing strategy.

Comments

( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
jongibbs
Nov. 17th, 2009 01:06 pm (UTC)
Good points, all :)
dr_phil_physics
Nov. 18th, 2009 06:38 am (UTC)
The best thing about writing contests for new writers is that they have deadlines. I might never have started finishing stories and actually sending them out to markets were it not for a series of contests I entered before I'd built up an "invenstory" that I could polish and send to pro markets.

Dr. Phil
nancyfulda
Nov. 18th, 2009 10:58 am (UTC)
Ha! That's so true. :)

Now that I think about it, I always entered contests at midnight on the due date. And my first two sales came from that.
ext_194196
Nov. 19th, 2009 12:22 am (UTC)
Testing the Waters
For me contests have been a nice excuse to write some flash fiction during the course of working on my first novel. The reason I was more willing to enter a contest than submit to an established magazine was because the contests provided a prompt. In my mind, at least the playing field began level. I look forward to more contests, although I have submitted a couple of pieces of short fiction to established mags over the last two months. Thanks for the post!
bothwill
Aug. 11th, 2010 04:51 pm (UTC)
It's interesting how you related marketing with writing contests. You are right, these contests are the perfect marketing tools, you need the right resources to organize a high interest contest, once you got that you don't have to worry about not having an audience.
Bothwill, easysaver rewards
zanamartin
Oct. 11th, 2010 04:22 pm (UTC)
Contests are a pleasant marketing tool because they are totally laid-back. Entrants don't have to make a purchase or ever come back to the site. It serves the noble goal of marketing ('making people aware of your product') without falling into the sleazy pitfalls ('pressuring people to buy something they don't really want').

The "noble" goal of marketing is NOT to "make people aware of your product" unless your product is unique. Marketing goal is usually to tell people why your product is better than the other similar products on the market.
rate it
nancyfulda
Oct. 11th, 2010 08:03 pm (UTC)
Good distinction.
(Anonymous)
Nov. 8th, 2010 02:08 pm (UTC)
The idea of a writing contest is similar with invention contests: it helps the young writers/inventors to see the opinion of an independent public and it gives quick and skillful evaluation of their work.
emi encore (http://www.encoremarketing.com)
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )

Profile

nancyfulda
nancyfulda

Publications

Web Site | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Google+






The Death and
Rebirth of
Anne Bonny

and other stories

amazon | kobo | barnes & noble | iTunes | Audible







Backlash
a novelette

amazon | kobo | barnes & noble | iTunes | Audible







That Undiscovered Country
Jim Baen Memorial
Award Winner


paperback | kindle | nook | PDF | Other





Movement
2011 Nebula Nominee

Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, March 2011

paperback | kindle | nook | smashwords





The Breath of Heaven
Stories from Distant Worlds

paperback | kindle | nook | smashwords






In the Halls of the Sky-Palace
Jim Baen's Universe, June 2009

kindle | nook | smashwords





Backlash (novelette)
Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, 2010

kindle | nook | smashwords





The Man Who
Murdered Himself

Phobos Award Winner

kindle | nook | smashwords





Dead Men Don't Cry:
11 Stories by Nancy Fulda


Paperback | kindle | nook | smashwords | DRM-free






Nothing This Fun Could be Good for You (article)
Available at:
Clarkesworld Magazine





Like Rain From Silver Skies
Available at:
Basement Stories





Knowing Neither Kin Nor Foe
Available at:
Beneath Ceaseless Skies


Nancy Fulda is a 2012 Hugo and Nebula Nominee, a Phobos Award winner and a Vera Hinckley Mayhew Award recipient. She is the first (and so far only) female recipient of the Jim Baen Memorial Award. Her fiction has appeared in a number of professional venues.

Nancy Fulda is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

Calendar

January 2017
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow